Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

The Need For Variation


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 otronics

otronics

    OTronics

  • Community Leader
  • 1,629 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 12:01 AM

Since a gig in the summer, I decided there and then "This is enough". I was refering to the songs played.

Dancing Queen, Macarana, Tainted Love etc are always played so I tried a bit of variation with success. smile.gif

Stand And Deliver, This Ole House, Hi Ho Silver Lining and some other ones which have a good beat to dance to and ones you don't hear every day were played.

Alternative slow tracks were played too. Angels is getting to me so have done some Rod Stewart slow ones (NOT Sailing) Have I Told You Lately, I Don't Wanna Talk About It, also Chi Lites Have You Seen Her, Lisa Stansfield In All The Right Places...

I have not played Dancing Queen etc since and no one has requested them. One person even commented pre-gig once that she was fed up of going to these weddings and other family events and hearing the same old tracks.

Yes, there are some which are good to play at nearly every gig (depending on event) like 5,6,7,8, YMCA and Saturday Night and in your case ADS, In The Hall Of The Mountain King (I know you play it EVERY gig)

Have you tried some variation yet? 533.gif
Oliver Head, OTronics Media Services Ltd, Covering Wiltshire, Somerset, Dorset and surrounding areas.

Professional Mobile & Radio DJ
PLI (10m), PAT and DBS (Disclosure) checked
Tel: 07835 485535
Email: enquiries@otronics.co.uk

www.otronics.co.uk

#2 scotty

scotty

    Experienced Contributor

  • Community Leader
  • 424 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 12:36 AM

The need for variation for who you or the people you are entertaining ? who's benefiting from this ? In my experience people dont care if you've heard the grease megamix 1000 times already in a week. Im sure we have all heard Slade / Wizzard a million times in the last few weeks but the clients your entertaining wont care about that.

I always judge each gig after ive seen the crowd i dont go in with a playlist, unless the B&G have filled one in beforehand. 533.gif
Scotty
KING OF DISCOS
We're what parties were invented for !
MySpace
'If anyone here hasnt enjoyed themselves this evening would you kindly raise your arm........, and slap yourself around the chops'

#3 High Fidelity

High Fidelity

    The Gentleman

  • Community Leader
  • 2,963 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 12:37 AM

I always try to play something different from what I presume every other DJ in my area is playing. The idea being, that people will remember me more because I played some tunes that they hadn't heard in ages.
Quitting Smoking & Drinking doesn't make you live longer

It just feels like it.



#4 ChrisPointon

ChrisPointon

    Forum Owner

  • Admin
  • 11,468 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 12:44 AM

QUOTE
Have you tried some variation yet?


Must admit i've had my fill of Variation over the last month or so 188.gif . With several Weddings which have literally been playlist almost jukebox style driven events, where the Bride and Grooms list has to be followed religiously yucky.gif .

I wouldn't mind a playlist which took into account the natural variation in the average mixed age group audience, or indeed a playlist from an event billed and advertised as being a specialised night such as a 60's night / Northern Soul etc, but what I can't abide, even in a customer driven industry like ours, are the specialised requests of one or two individuals inflicted onto 100 others, without even the courtesy to honour some of their guests tastes in music and their requests as well. Pretty pointless inviting them along if you aren;t willing to take into consideration that small thing.

I know i'm ranting again, but it's been a long month with difficult playlists containing music which you normally wouldn't play at a family occasion, and where the tracks are more easy listening than encouraging people to dance.

Yes, variety is the spice of life, and we all need a change from time to time, but any playlist, even a variation should contain tracks that people (i) Recognise and (ii) Which stand a more than average chance of getting people on the dancefloor, and sadly the playlists recently haven't factored in any of the above rolleyes.gif

As Scotty says, at most private functions, it's only you (the dj) who gets fed up of hearing the same tracks every week, some of the guests at your function may not have been to a function for years, and last heard Uptown Girl several years ago!. Although I must admit when I did residency work, the crowd could almost predict the tracks and the order they were played!. But we are only human! smile.gif

So i'm actually looking forward to going back to the old routine this weekend, NO PLAYLISTS, Wayheyyyy! smile.gif

Why Buy New - New, Ex-Demo and Graded Disco Equipment at below retail prices

 

The Glow Factory - Bulk Discounts on Glow Sticks


#5 milhouse

milhouse

    Experienced Contributor

  • Community Leader
  • 618 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 12:45 AM

I think some "Non-typical" tracks thrown into each gig is a benefit for both the DJ and the party guests. It's stuff that you don't play over and over again, and something the audience won't have heard at every wedding, party or bar they've been to over the last couple of years.

I tried playing "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None the Richer at the end of gigs and some other DJs who I work with - said that they had never thought of playing it before... I don't know how common/uncommon it actually is - but at least it was something different to what everyone else in my agency is playing.

Most DJs that I hear all play the same songs, with very little variation, however I like to add my own choices that I don't hear all the time. Im not sure how common they are in the grand scheme of things, but stuff that I play that Ive never heard any other party DJs play around here, include:

Oasis - Don't look back in anger
Dusty Springfield - Son of a preacher man
Lipps Inc - Funky Town
Tom Jones - Black Betty


#6 Hugmaster

Hugmaster

    Listen to me carefully, but don't watch me too close!

  • Community Leader
  • 1,614 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 06:24 AM

Hi

I think mixing it up is both of benefit to the DJ and the end user. If the DJ is bored of the songs he/she is playing, it will translate up.

Some songs I've included at most recent gigs that I don't normally play are...

KC and the Sunshien Band, Give it up
Prince, 1999
Adam Ant, Goody two shoes
Shakin' Stevens, Green door
Billy Joel, Tell her about it
Human League, Love action
Whispers, it's a love thing
Average White Band, Let's go round again
Hazel Deen, Searchin'
Howard Jones, New song
Take That, could it be magic
Barry manilo, Copa Cobana
Shaman, Ebaniza good

Etc etc...

Don't think I've had a floor die yet.

Darren
Take a listen to Music Matters, the Big Mix Entertainment podcast, featuring music from the Podsafe Music Network.

#7 YourBigEvent

YourBigEvent

    yourBIGevent

  • Community Leader
  • 10,299 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 07:42 AM

Never play Dancing Queen


.....but what do I know ?



Your Big Event
Office:01803 813540
Direct: 0797 0717 448
e.mail:info@yourbigevent.co.uk

#8 transeurope

transeurope

    Experienced Contributor

  • Community Leader
  • 512 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 09:39 AM

People tell white lies. They go upto the DJ and say "great gig" because they know the end of the script:
"thanks, very much, I am delighted you enjoyed yourself".

This is a low stress interaction with the DJ for an exhuasted customer.

Consider the alternative, if the person says what they really feel:
"Hey, I always hear the same songs over and over, why don't you guys get real?"
"Well, it's because I want the dancefloor full and I go for the lowest common denominator"

or something like that

Now in a conversation like this, the person either has to keep criticising the DJ until they have "won", or back down and "get told a thing or two by the DJ".

Neither is a pleasant way to spend your time. So people don't bother.

There are a lot of people fed up with the traditional playset. The real way to find this out is to pull off a successful disco that doesn't use it.

THEN people can have the following low stress conversation:
"great disco, you didn't play the usual old censored2.gif do you know how many times I have heard ......I'm so fed up"


I think that as disco has moved from new and differnt to mainstream and routine that people are expecting a lot more from it.

#9 C.S

C.S

    forum annoyance

  • Community Leader
  • 6,249 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 10:06 AM

Doing a lot of work in clubs i know there are always going to be 4/5 tracks during the evening that i always play But i always try and not play them in the same places or order !
I will try anything,once!

The Cornish will arise again !
Manager of the Andy Harris Fan Club.
Keep pasties Cornish

#10 High Fidelity

High Fidelity

    The Gentleman

  • Community Leader
  • 2,963 posts

Posted 16 December 2005 - 02:15 PM

I frequently get told at the end of the night "You played some great music tonight".

One of the things that keeps me on my toes for variety is that I do a lot of disco's for relatives of a close friend who has a big family, so I see the same faces at quite a few gigs. I always try to play something different at each one, and they notice it.
Quitting Smoking & Drinking doesn't make you live longer

It just feels like it.



#11 Andy Westcott

Andy Westcott

    Anti ProDub

  • Moderated
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,457 posts

Posted 17 December 2005 - 06:50 PM

Could the reason why so many of the tracks played are so often heard be simply because they are darned good, outstanding pieces of music?

There are only so many really good danceable tracks which come out of any particular era, so it follows that DJs will concentrate on those to a degree, although I'm all for a bit of variation especially if you play to the same crowd many times.

There's a lot of 'opinion' thrown about about so-called 'cheese', but these songs are usually evergreens which will last for ever, and which people enjoy listening/dancing to. I feel the way 'cheese' is being perceived is being severely wounded by the flood of 'best of...' albums advertised on TV in recent times, and this is possibly responsible for some peoples' attitudes towards this class of music.
Hot Fusion Mobile Disco
Covering South, Mid & East Devon.
"A decent traditional style disco for an affordable price."

#12 clivehenryjones

clivehenryjones

    Occasional Contributor

  • Regular Contributor
  • PipPip
  • 71 posts

Posted 02 January 2006 - 11:02 AM

I agree we need to keep it varied. A couple of tracks that have surprisingly (to me) gone down well recently....

Reef - Place your hands
Blondie - Atomic

Both great in their day, but also seem to be popular with the "youngsters" as well.

I guess it's because both have strong guitar intros. notworthy.gif

Clive.

#13 spinner

spinner

    DJU Veteran

  • Community Leader
  • 3,674 posts

Posted 02 January 2006 - 12:01 PM

QUOTE (transeurope @ Dec 16 2005, 09:39 AM)



There are a lot of people fed up with the traditional playset.

I never see other mobile DJs at work so I have no idea what this is. What is it please?

#14 transeurope

transeurope

    Experienced Contributor

  • Community Leader
  • 512 posts

Posted 02 January 2006 - 02:29 PM

The traditional playset is that set of least common denominator records that I always try to avoid playing, but to be honest end up playing more of than I would like.

I think the classic least common denominator record is Abba's Dancing Queen or Gloria Gaynor's I Will Survive. You could have a young lady coming up to you telling you how you should be playing dance or RnB and five minutes later there she is happily dancing to one of them! It's like it is preprogrammed in the gene set!

A lot of effort is put into establishing what these records are. Many US websites publish Top200s. Even though they are designed for the US market, guess what? A lot of them work over here also. They are also the ones that Music Factory put on their various CD sets.

Even though it kind of works, it is also only a plastic way of doing a disco. It's like a doctor treating an unknown infection with a lot of broad spectrum antibiotics. Sure it works, but it's not the right way to do it.

There are very few discos where I do not reach for the standard playset records at SOME stage, but I think you should TRY not to....

PS: It is a great idea to watch other DJs. And keep silent. They all must be doing SOMETHING right, otherwise they would not get bookings. Each chap has at least one good idea. It's up to you to figure out what it is. It could be something bizarre, like he dresses well and has a nice car. Some people like that! Image can be imprortant too. Frequently, however, it may be, especially in the UK, that he has an expert knowledge of one particular kind of music, like ska, or something. That may only come out at one stage in the night. And for goodness sake, DON'T come upto him/her and say "hi, I'm a DJ too....". That is really annoying. Just sit quiet and learn. I still do.

#15 spinner

spinner

    DJU Veteran

  • Community Leader
  • 3,674 posts

Posted 02 January 2006 - 05:00 PM

QUOTE (transeurope @ Jan 2 2006, 02:29 PM)
I think the classic least common denominator record is Abba's Dancing Queen or Gloria Gaynor's I Will Survive. You could have a young lady coming up to you telling you how you should be playing dance or RnB and five minutes later there she is happily dancing to one of them! It's like it is preprogrammed in the gene set!

A lot of effort is put into establishing what these records are. Many US websites publish Top200s. Even though they are designed for the US market, guess what? A lot of them work over here also. They are also the ones that Music Factory put on their various CD sets.

There are very few discos where I do not reach for the standard playset records at SOME stage, but I think you should TRY not to....


Thanks for that.

The last time I played "I Will Survive", without it being requested, was in 1997. I think it's been requested maybe twice since then.

I avoid Abba stuff unless requested. Some crowds, of course, love it.

I haven't bought anything by Music Factory for at least 6 years.

I am sure I'm not unique.











0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users