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Thanks for all the input on this thread, on this page is a pdf you can d/l which may be of use to you. It's the doc I put together for the seminar we delivered 2 weeks ago.

 

Enjoy!

 

Thanks for that Brian that was really informative.

 

I know my music pretty well and like a broad spectrum of genres.

 

My mixing can certainly be improved.

 

Will keep striving to improve

 

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Very interesting Brian, I would have liked to attend your seminar but could only get on the Saturday so this has made up for it a bit. I think what you say makes a lot of sense. I suppose I do a lot of what you say without actually classing myself as a mixing DJ. I need to practice the beat matching bit though :hphone:

I think that will have to be my new year resolution. Well done on the seminar, you are all a credit to the DJ

business.

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I reckon its more important to pick the songs first, then mix them if you can. Too many DJ's seem to let the mix (or technology) dictate what the next song is going to be, with no regard for the programme material. These are bad DJ's. Snazzy effects such as backspins, scratching, creative beatmixing etc are OK when used sparingly but quickly become tiring and irksome to the average clubber! Modern technology with key-control and +-100% tempo means its technically possibly to mix the most unlikely things together...but should you do it, just because it's possible? I know a few full-time club DJ's who will mix into a song thats had to be speeded up by +10% or more just to 'get it in'. The result is that it sounds ridiculous to the dancer on the floor.

 

In my last residency I think I only ever beatmixed two or three songs a night into each other, the rest of the time they were just fade-in or outs, with or without talking. This was because we were playing 80's pop & chart, we weren't a house or trance venue. And yes, I can beatmix perfectly on CD and vinyl (on any make machine that has a pitch control!).

 

If you only play dance clubs then the serious punter (and promoter) will almost expect you to mix all night without dropping a beat. But this is a million miles away from the average party night!

 

:hide:

 

 

 

 

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I think I can do the music selection quite well, I dont normally have a problem with getting people up dancing, but I would love to be able to mix properly as I think it improves the flow and is more likely to keep people up where they should be......on the dancefloor!

Im now aiming my business at the younger persons party as I find these the more fun to do so I think getting the mixing right would be a great skill for me to learn.

 

How do I book a place on your BPM Seminar Brian?

 

Well I went to the seminar, and certainly picked up a few things which I have tried to put into practice.

 

I have been using Traktor 3 for quite a while, but when I was having to do everything with a mouse, it was somewhat difficult to operate the controls at the right times....

So I bought a Behringer BCD3000 Controler which works with Traktor....

 

And I have to say what with Brian, Marcs and the other bloke (sorry cant remember his name) tips at BPM and putting them into practice on the BCD.....I think I have improved...

 

Dancing seems to flow better

Seem to be keeping more people on the floor for longer

People seem to be enjoying themselfs more

AND IM enjoying myself more at gigs too as its a lot more fun trying to mix things up a bit...

Dont get me wrong Im a long way from being an expert, but Im certain things have improved and I would love to get better at it.

 

So cheers Brian, Marc and the other bloke :Thumbup:

 

 

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I reckon its more important to pick the songs first, then mix them if you can. Too many DJ's seem to let the mix (or technology) dictate what the next song is going to be, with no regard for the programme material. These are bad DJ's.

 

But.. in choosing that next song, do you not think about its tempo, relative to what your playing to keep the flow right and not suprise the dancers? If they are of a similar tempo, then its possible to mix without any drastic changes, unless of course, one has a sudden beginning/end. Being the best song and being the best song that mixes aren't mutually exclusive.

 

 

Revolution Discos - Covering Midlands and the Cotswolds - 01386 898 113 - 07791 261 263

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in choosing that next song, do you not think about its tempo, relative to what your playing to keep the flow right and not suprise the dancers?

 

Too right yah do Dan!

 

Gotta admit when I first started I couldnt work out why one minute I would have a full dancefloor and the next.....everybodys gone!

Dont get me wrong it still happens sometimes now as Im sure it does to all of us from time to time.

 

But now I know a bit more about mixing than what I did it seems to be making things better for the dancers and for me coz Im finding it more fun and challenging.

 

 

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Yeah of course, the tempo's important if it's that sort of venue or night, I think its less important at a party event really. And there's no saying I've necessarily got the 12 inch version of the next song I want to play (they dont always release 'em!!) and so dont have the luxury of a 30 sec intro. (Seamless loops are hard on an ancient Cloud mixer and SL1210's!!).

 

And sometimes, esp. on say a 6 hour set, the punters will get bored of the same tempo all night and occasionally enjoy the contrast..so long as its not from hard house to RnB in one jump!

 

Yeah, I'm still young enough (just) to go clubbing on a Saturday night and do enjoy getting into a sweat on the floor for a half-hour or so continuous mix, the point I'm making is that brilliant mixing is no excuse for poor programming. The best big-name DJ's we all know can mix all night with a variety of tempos, bring it in slowly, building up, taking it down etc as the night progresses, fitting in requests, stopping to cut the cake or announcing the buffet....

 

:hide:

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Yeah of course, the tempo's important if it's that sort of venue or night, I think its less important at a party event really. And there's no saying I've necessarily got the 12 inch version of the next song I want to play (they dont always release 'em!!) and so dont have the luxury of a 30 sec intro. (Seamless loops are hard on an ancient Cloud mixer and SL1210's!!).

 

And sometimes, esp. on say a 6 hour set, the punters will get bored of the same tempo all night and occasionally enjoy the contrast..so long as its not from hard house to RnB in one jump!

 

Yeah, I'm still young enough (just) to go clubbing on a Saturday night and do enjoy getting into a sweat on the floor for a half-hour or so continuous mix, the point I'm making is that brilliant mixing is no excuse for poor programming. The best big-name DJ's we all know can mix all night with a variety of tempos, bring it in slowly, building up, taking it down etc as the night progresses, fitting in requests, stopping to cut the cake or announcing the buffet....

 

:hide:

Spot on, the music choice is completely key to what you do on each night.

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  • 1 month later...

:bouncy: Love it, same with me (apart from the Red Coat bit).

 

Back to the original thread, I have had a go, but my gear is only really up to simple mixing, (bit like me - lol), I have sneaked the odd well practised mix of two tunes with same bpm in the past but I dont think anybody other than me noticed :ads: . I don't think not mixing makes you a poor DJ as choice of tunes and knowing that old classic that everyone had forgotten about gets a lot bigger reaction, from personal experience. But as CS points out it must be good getting people to dance to a tune that would normally see them heading to the Bar by seamlessly mixing in that track would be well cool. I am in need of some new deck's as mine are now ten years old and knackered so maybe when I have the technology to help me a bit I might make more of an effort. Respect to all you lads and lasses that can mix though :nbow:

 

I've got to agree with the 'Non - mixers' out there on the whole - I can certainly see the need for mixing in order to keep a full dancefloor in a nightclub BUT as an ex entertainer (singer guitarist) for many years,I am all in favour of keeping the audience on their toes (or feet!) by reading the audience and having a lot of variety in a set rather than blending tracks into each other - keeping the surprise element as well as having a lot of interaction/banter with the crowd where possible.I'm not talking about lots of yawning gaps and non-sensical gibberish between tracks but having fun with the crowd when the opportunity presents itself.

Does it really matter if someone leaves the dancefloor for a certain track? Someone else will probably love the track and get up to dance anyway and as long as you choose the tracks that people know and love,chances are they are going to have a great time.- which is what it's all about.

Certainly, this way of performing would not be acceptable to a young crowd and would be the kiss of death to the evening as they expect the DJ to be a 'Mix-Doctor' but as I am catering for an older crowd I don't really think it's necessary.

Only my humble opinion....

Having said all that, hats off to you guys 'n' gals that have mastered this fine art - anyone who can do what you do deserves the utmost admiration! :joe:

 

 

Captain of the good ship 'Andromeda' - a bit of a wreck like meself but at least she will look better with time......

 

PS. 'Pugwash' rules!!!

 

Mobile DJ based on the Fylde coast and covering Lancashire & the north west,

playing 60's - present day chart music.

Country / Line Dance events catered for with the best in Modern Country music.

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As someone totally new to Dj'ing (but not to music) I personally would love to learn to mix properly..even if I never had to do it at a gig. It's another skillset...and it does sound great when done correctly..so why not.

 

I imagine to the majority of Mobile DJ's it's not an essential skill to master...but at the same time, anything that might make you better at your chosen craft can't be a bad thing.

 

 

Just my tuppence happenny worth :rolleyes:

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ive seen many people have all the bells and whistles of djing just to make them look good but when it comes down to the song selecting their aload of c:cense:p also they was all over with their levels all night,didt really know how to operate their £5,000 equipment.

 

the music will only sound as good as what gos in the mixer/amp

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I know it is essential for club dj's to do it, but to be honest as a mobile dj playing a diverse selection of music in a short period of time I dont feel it's necessary.

 

I am open to change though.

 

Jim

 

Tend to agree with Jim here.

Its all accord where your market is targeted, if you mainly cater for 18's & 21st's then yes i should imagine mixing is important, but for wedding / corporate work its not needed.

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I only tend to mix certain tracks together, I find people complain if you mix to much during the night and I don't enjoy it as much as I did say 15-20 yrs ago.

Mixing with vinyl was fun with a laptop isn't, it only works for me when you get a good reaction from the crowd and thats usually by doing something different and out of the ordinary (try sticking 9-5 in the middle of a dance track!!!!)

 

Educating the young in the ways of the old

 

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